A little idea with a Hornby 4-Vep and…

April 6, 2018

Hornby released its BR (SR) 4-Vep in numerous liveries a few years’ ago and in the main, it is not a bad model – easier to work on than trying to build one from Mark 1 coaches and brass sides. It has its difficulties, namely a poor drive system (which can be replaced relatively easily); under size roof vents and end gangway corridor connection mouldings which are not accurate. The cab windows are slightly under-size too – all issues to be addressed on my models.

Livery colours applied to the  Network South-east (NSE) face-lifted version of the model are pretty good except for the application of an orange line along the rain gutter at cantrail level and not an NSE red one. Some serious modellers commented on the poor representation of the corridor compartments in both of the DTC vehicles. I have been upgrading my pair of Hornby 4-Vep models with new dome roof vents of the correct size, EM gauge wheels to run on Folkestone East and adjustments to the livery. The roofs are not painted with Railmatch ‘roof dirt’ to weather them in a little. Although black is the correct colour for NSE, the roofs were either never painted or became dirty very quickly.

Roof work on the Hornby 4-Vep vehicles.

Recently, the Bachmann/Kernow Model Rail Centre 4TC set was released. Here’s one DTS vehicle…

Both the full-size 4-Vep and 4TC sets shared the same cab design. It is interesting to compare the two models.

4-Vep DTC is on the right.

4TC DTS is on the left.

So what is the connection between the two models as far as my layout fleet plans are concerned?A good question and it is one that a good friend of mine and I have been exploring. Here is the answer:
A Vep/4TC hybrid was formed in April 1992 when 4TC DTS No. S76725, late of a 6-Rep reform, was added to face-lifted 4-Vep No. 3473, both painted in NSE livery. This reformation was temporary and S76725 was placed in unface-lifted 4-Vep No. 3169 (above) making a very nice hybrid set which ran around until the unit was face-lifted in early 1995. Emerging from the works as No. 3582, the unit was painted in Connex livery and lasted, with the 4TC DTS, almost until the end of slam-door unit operation. S76275 was never face-lifted internally and is now preserved – a remarkable survivor.

So there you are – I plan to add the Bachmann/Kernow 4TC DTS vehicle, leftover from one of my friends departmental train projects, to a Hornby 4-Vep set. I could renumber it as No. 3473, but that unit was short-lived in Hybrid form. Alternatively, I could rebuild a face-lifted MBSO from the Hornby NSE model and add the DTS vehicle to the train in lieu of a DTC to create No. 3169. Rebuilding the remaining 4- Vep DTC cab front, gangway door together with renumbering of the vehicles and changing end numbers will be required. Now that would be so much more fun than a straight 4-Vep!

 

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First Bachmann 4-Cep conversion.

April 11, 2017

The Bachmann 4-Cep in original condition as supplied out of the box. A conversion is more of a long project than anything of extreme complexity. Until you have to repaint it!

A long overdue project for my EM gauge Folkestone East project is to convert several OO gauge Bachmann Class 411 4-Cep units to represent the Swindon refurbished units; work undertaken to upgrade the fleet in the early 1980s. The model, as it is supplied, is a four-car set in original ‘as built’ condition with typical Mark 1 coach features. The refurbished 4-Cep conversion involves a long-winded removal of the glazing units and moulded window frames; relocating the guards compartments to the CK and fitting of new glazing units and hopper window frames. The moulded window frames were pared away and smoothed down ready for the new etched ones which are fitted once all painting is complete. The stainless steel colour will be a good representation of the unpainted bare metal of those fitted to refurbished 4-Ceps. This was done using a stainless steel etch designed by another Southern Region modeller called David Crow (see below) and kindly made freely available.

The guards compartment was relocated to a middle trailer during refurbishment work. The original guards compartments in the outer DMBSO vehicles was removed to provide an additional seating bay.

The conversion will involve several other detail changes including swapping the bogies for Commonwealth types and double checking the type of roof ventilator fitted to your chosen unit – they did vary with ridge dome, scallop dome and shell vents all featuring in the 4-Cep fleet. I started work by converting the corridor composite trailer into a composite brake – the two guards compartments in the outer DMBSO trailers being located to bring the 4-Ceps in line with other express stock such as the 4-Cig, 4-Big and 4-Vep units.

Filing plastic away to fit the etched overlay section flush with the rest of the coach sides.

With the guards compartment relocated, the DMBSOs are converted to remove the guards compartments from those vehicles and cut in new windows for an additional seating bay. The etched window frames are used as a guide.

Once positioned as near as can be, the window in the original double doors is sealed up and the new windows cut in on both sides of the trailer.

The door line, door handle and hinges are removed too to create a smooth surface. Some filling is required to complete this work.

A final rub down in the kitchen sink with fine wet and dry paper and the model is ready for the paint shop – models rarely look well after this much work. The first coat of paint will quickly reveal flaws in the body work that need further attention. Rub down again, fill where necessary and re-coat before progressing to more complex parts of the livery! This model is to become No. 1562 finished in Network South-East livery (see below). The full size unit survived until around 2004.